Fahamu Refugee Legal Aid Newsletter

The Fahamu Refugee Legal Aid Newsletter is a monthly publication that focuses on the provision of refugee legal aid. It is aimed primarily to be a resource for legal aid providers in the Global South where law journals and other resources are hard to access. It complements the information portal
http://www.refugeelegalaidinformation.org
The newsletter follows recent developments in the interpretation of refugee law; case law precedents from different constituencies; reports and helpful resources for refugee legal aid providers; and stories of struggle and success in refugee legal aid work.

RESOURCES

Video of conference on detention of immigrants
A video of ‘Detention of immigrants: Enforcement, non-compliance, and punishment’, a presentation by Dr Dan Wilsher (author of Immigration detention: Law, history, politics) on 8 March 2012 in Geneva, has been posted on the Global Detention Project website. The event was co-organised by the Global Detention Project and the Programme for the Study of Global Migration.

Updated manual on Article 11 European Court of Human Rights (ECHR)
INTERIGHTS has produced a series of legal manuals as a reference for lawyers wishing to familiarise themselves with a given Article of the ECHR. Each manual includes a theoretical part on the standards of the ECHR and a compilation of citations from the case law of the European Court of Human Rights. The Article 11 manual — on freedom of assembly and association — has recently been updated and the latest version is now available online. A Russian translation is also available.

International Refugee Law Committee of the American Bar Association newsletter, blog, email list
The International Refugee Law Committee (IRLC) of the American Bar Association (ABA) has launched a monthly newsletter that follows international refugee legal updates and news, educational opportunities in the field and current job postings, and is launching a blog aimed at reaching members outside of the ABA and providing a forum for members to engage and share ideas with practitioners worldwide. The IRLC also has an email list, Facebook page, Twitter account and LinkedIn profile, available through their website.

Round-ups of relevant new articles and information
The Forced Migration Current Awareness Blog has posted collections of new articles and information relevant to refugee legal aid on a wide variety of topics: legal articles and presentations; children (here and here); detention, repatriation, statelessness, Asia, the Middle East and North Africa (here, here and here ), Africa (here and here), the Caucasus (here and here), Europe, the United States, Canada (here and here), the Americas, the European Union; new journal issues (here and here,); and events and opportunities (in the United Kingdom, and in April).

Website on protracted refugee situations
A new website on Protracted Refugee Situations (PRS), developed by the University of Oxford’s Refugee Studies Centre (RSC), provides key facts and figures, information, and resources related to the study of protracted displacement, including: case studies; themes; updated information and related publications on an on-going research project titled ‘Unlocking crises of protracted displacement for refugees and internally displaced persons' led by the RSC in cooperation with Norwegian-based organisations and the Internal Displacement Monitoring Centre; and other projects.

APRRN March 2012 newsletter
The March 2012 issue of the Asia Pacific Refugee Rights Network Newsletter is now available. The issue includes articles on: APRRN Southeast Asia Legal Aid Training; Campaign to end the immigration detention of children; SAPA Task Force Meetings; NGO Statement for the 53rd UNHCR Standing Committee Meeting; Refugee Bill passed in Korea; Immigration crackdown in Malaysia; Thailand’s release of stateless children from the Immigration Detention Centre; Development of Standard Operating Procedures in Indonesia; as well as Secretariat updates, upcoming APRRN activities, and other important dates. 

APRRN releases this newsletter every 23 months, and readers can subscribe to receive it here.

Toolkit to help understand DHS prosecution
The Catholic Legal Immigration Network, Inc. (CLINIC) in the United States recently posted a Prosecutorial Discretion Toolkit on its website, containing the government documents, articles, sample letters and motions, practice advisories and other materials to help nonprofit attorneys, accredited representatives and advocates understand Department of Homeland Security (DHS) prosecutorial discretion enforcement policies and practices. The Toolkit was originally prepared for a training on 28 February 2012, sponsored by CLINIC, Catholic Charities of the Archdiocese of DC, the American Immigration Lawyers Association, the American Immigration Council, Arent Fox, LLC, and Maggio+Kattar, PC.

 
Sixth edition of Refugee Law Reader
The Refugee Law Reader is a comprehensive online model curriculum for the study of the complex and rapidly evolving field of international asylum and refugee law, committed to providing a ‘universal’ view of refugee protection that teachers and scholars around the globe can study and analyse. Its Sixth Edition  continues the Reader’s expansion and is even more comprehensive in scope than prior editions. This edition begins with two sections that focus on international refugee law; the following four sections focus, in turn, on the legal frameworks for refugee protection in Africa, Asia, Europe,and the Americas.

The Reader is aimed for the use of professors, lawyers, advocates and students across a wide range of national jurisdictions. It provides a flexible course structure that can be easily adapted to meet a range of training and resource needs. The Reader also offers access to the complete texts of up-to-date core legal materials, instruments, and academic commentary. In its entirety, the Refugee Law Reader is designed to provide a full curriculum for a 48-hour course in International Refugee Law and contains over 700 documents and materials.

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